Centre for Asian Legal Studies

Past Events


China and the Death of American Comparative Law
13 February 2017, Monday
12.30pm - 1.30pm
Executive Seminar Room, Level 3, Block B, NUS (BTC)

Chinese Constitutionalism: An Oxymoron?
26 January 2017, Thursday
3.00pm - 5.00pm
Executive Seminar Room, Level 3, Block B, NUS (BTC)

Courts and Democracies in Asia
20 January 2017, Friday
1.00pm - 2.00pm
Executive Seminar Room, Level 3, Block B, NUS (BTC)

Roundtable Discussion on The Structure and Nature of Constitutional Rights
19 January 2017, Thursday
9.30am - 3.30pm
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)
(Participation is by invitation only.)

David and Goliath Struggle in the Timor Sea
13 January 2017, Friday
12.30pm - 2.00pm
Federal Bartholomew Conference Room, Federal Building, NUS (BTC)

Law, Authoritarianism, and Democracy in Asia Symposium
12 & 13 December 2016
9.00am to 5.30pm (Day 1)
9.00am to 12.30pm (Day 2)
BTC Staff Lounge, Level 2, Block B, NUS (BTC)
(Participation is by invitation only)

Roundtable Discussion: Postsecular Comparative Law
7 December 2016, Wednesday
3.00pm - 5.00pm
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)
(This is a closed-door event. Participation is by invitation only.)

Debating Singapore's Elected Presidency Workshop
16 November 2016, Wednesday
9.30am - 2.00pm
Block B Meeting Room, Level 2, Block B, NUS (BTC)
(Participation is by invitation only)

CALS Book Launch cum Panel Discussion on Islam and The State in Myanmar
3 November 2016, Thursday
5.30pm - 7.30pm
BTC Staff Lounge, Level 2, Block B, NUS (BTC)

Why Ethnocracy is Conceptually Alien to the Malaysian Constitution
by Associate Professor Rueban Balasubramaniam
21 October 2016, Friday
12.30pm - 1.30pm
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Sen Building, NUS (BTC)

Law and Society in Asia: Defining and Advancing the Field
Asian Law and Society Association Inaugural Conference

Singapore 22-23 September 2016
Faculty of Law, NUS (BTC)

CALS Book Launch - Criminal Law in Myanmar
15 September 2016, Thursday
Seminar Room 4-4, Block B, NUS (BTC)

Towards a Theory of Progressive Trade
by Professor David Lametti
9 September 2016, Friday
12.30pm - 2.00pm
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)

Muslim Minorities in Malaysia
by Dr Mohd Faizal Musa (Faisal Tehrani)
2 September 2016, Friday
2.30pm - 4.00pm
Block B Conference Room, Level 2, Block B, NUS (BTC)

India's New Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) Regime on the Airline Industry: Changes and Challenges
by Dr Lee Jae Woon
26 August 2016, Friday
12.30pm - 2.00pm
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)

Seminar on Japanese Arbitration Law and UNCITRAL Model Law
by Associate Professor Hisashi Harata
19 August 2016, Friday
12.30pm - 1.30pm
Executive Seminar Room, Level 3, Block B, NUS (BTC)

Seminar on Overlapping Consensus or Clash of Normativities? The Malaysian approach to zakat management and its (in-) compatibility with secular humanitarianism
by Dr Dominik Müller
12 August 2016, Friday
12.30pm - 1.30pm
Block B Conference Room, Level 2, Block B, NUS (BTC)

CALS Book Launch - Constitutional Interpretation in Singapore : Theory and practice
26 July 2016, Tuesday

Public Opinion on the Legal Status of Sexual Minorities in Singapore and Hong Kong
24 June 2016, Friday
10.00am - 12.00pm
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)

Topic: Regulation of Same-Sex Sexual Conduct and Public Attitudes in Singapore
By Assistant Professor Lynette J. Chua

Chua's presentation is based on a recent random household survey that measures Singaporean attitudes on sexual regulation, particularly Section 377A of the Penal Code, the provision that criminalizes sexual conduct between men. It is the first that specifically studies public opinion on same-sex sexual conduct, its criminalization by Section 377A, the retention, enforcement, and repeal of Section 377A, as well as public knowledge about the law. The survey results and analysis are critical as the government places great importance on societal views in formulating its position on Section 377A. The presentation, drawn from a draft article, examines the survey results together with socio-legal scholarship to critically analyze the government's position, as well as the impact of the law itself on shaping public opinion.

Topic: Public opinions in Hong Kong on legislation against discrimination on the grounds o sexual orientation, gender identity and intersex status - debunking myths with empirical evidence
By Assistant Professor Yiu-tung Seun

Within debates about sexual citizenship, a certain myth assumes that 'Chinese values' and 'familial culture' render jurisdictions influenced by Chinese culture particularly conservative in terms of public opinions towards non-heterosexuality issues. This paper analyzes empirical public opinion data collected through mixed methods - including a territory-wide telephone survey with 1,005 respondents; qualitative findings collected from three public forums, 14 LGBTI focus groups, 13 public focus groups including those with strong concerns, as well as online and postal submission of opinions - from the 'Study on Legislation against Discrimination on the Grounds of Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Intersex Status' conducted by the Gender Research Centre, commissioned by the Equal Opportunities Commission, an independent statutory body of the Hong Kong government. First, the findings suggest that 'Chinese values' and 'familial culture' are subject to wide and varied interpretations and may not necessarily be negative towards non-heterosexuality issues. Second, it argues that there is a dramatic difference among different age groups in terms of their opinions on the issues, signaling a social paradigm shift. This means that the 'Chinese culture' is always in flux. This paper as a whole argues that the argument that a certain culture itself is necessarily conservative on sexuality issues warrants scrutiny

TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

Socioeconomic Rights in India: Origins, Development, and Concerns Going Forward
by Assosciate Professor Rehan Abeyratne
25 May 2016, Wednesday
12.00pm - 1.30pm
Federal Bartholomew Conference Room, Federal Building, NUS (BTC)

This seminar will introduce the main themes of my forthcoming book, SOCIOECONOMIC RIGHTS IN INDIA (Oxford University Press). It will briefly overview the origins of socioeconomic rights jurisprudence in India by examining the Constituent Assembly Debates and early case law. It will then discuss the Indian Supreme Court's creative procedural and substantive innovations in constitutional interpretation that permitted the judiciary to play an active role in recognizing and enforcing socioeconomic rights. It will also address three concerns about this jurisprudence: (1) that it threatens constitutional legitimacy; (2) that it impinges on democratic policy-making; and (3), that, as a practical matter, legal judgments have not have not been effectively enforced. The seminar will conclude by proposing how India's well-intentioned socioeconomic rights jurisprudence could be more effective in practice.

TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

CALL FOR PAPERS
Law and Society in Asia: Defining and Advancing the Field
Asian Law and Society Inaugural Conference
Singapore 22-23 September 2016
Faculty of Law, NUS Bukit Timah Campus


Submission Deadline for abstracts: 31 March 2016

The Centre for Asian Legal Studies (CALS) is pleased to solicit proposals for participation for the Asian Law and Society Inaugural Conference entitled Law and Society in Asia: Defining and Advancing the Field.. The conference will be held at NUS in Singapore on 22-23 September 2016.

How do people understand grievances and conflicts? How do they resolve disputes? What do they think of the concept of rights? How do they relate to formal legal systems and other normative orders? What is the relationship between law and social change? What are the roles of institutional actors, such as judges and lawyers, and non-institutional actors? These are some of the questions that have long animated law and society scholars to go beyond formal legal institutions, legal doctrine and legal texts to examine law and law-like behaviour, norms, and relationships in a variety of social settings, including liberal democracies, authoritarian regimes, villages, cities, families, corporations, religious groups, and migrant communities.

These questions, too, have motivated researchers interested in law and society in Asia. As demonstrated by research on Europe, North America, and other regions, law and society has great potential to contribute to academic theory, law-making, and public policy. However, Asian law and society scholarship has just begun to emerge as a highly significant academic field, its development hindered by differences in scholarly traditions and practices across the region. In some countries, such as Japan, Korea, and India, law and society is a well-established field. In other parts of Asia, such as Southeast Asia, law and society has little recognition and shallow roots.

With the above in mind, the inaugural ALSA conference welcomes papers and panels that resonate with this theme. Other proposals based on any law and society topic concerned with Asia will also be welcome.

For more information please click HERE

To submit your abstract please click HERE

Law and Development in China and Vietnam
20 & 21 April 2016, Tuesday & Wednesday
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)

The Centre for Asian Legal Studies (CALS) is pleased to invite you to the CALS International Symposium entitled 'Law and Development in China and Vietnam'. The workshop will be convened by Dr. Bui and Assoc Prof Wang and will be held at NUS in Singapore on 20-21 April 2016.

China and Vietnam, the two socialist countries in Asia, have both embarked on rule of law - oriented economic liberalisation and domestic reform. Although their economic and political systems are very similar, recent developments of the two countries's socialist paths have demonstrated more divergence than convergence. This symposium brings a group of international distinguished scholars to examine the underlying forces in the bidirectional relationship between the law and economic and political developments in China, covering issues including rule of law, constitutional reform, anti-corruption, judicial reform, foreign investment, and role of international law in national development.

TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

Judicial Trends in Child Custody Cases in Bangladesh: Traditional Islamic Law Rules versus Welfare Consideration
7 April 2016, Thursday
12.00pm - 1.30pm
Federal Bartholomew Conference Room, Federal Building, NUS (BTC)
TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

CROSSING BORDERS IN A TROUBLED WORLD: Youth's perspective on transnational migration related issues
31 March to 1 April 2016
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)

With the increase in globalization, migration has been a major phenomenon world-wide, especially in the post-world war era. The 2009 Human Development Report (HDR) observes that one out of seven persons (or one billion people) in the world is a migrant. Thus migration has been a major issue in shaping economic policies, laws, cultural values and social structure. Connected to this issue are concerns regarding refugees, human trafficking and notions of citizenship. All these matters are not only factors framing national laws and policies, but are also affecting trans-boundary relationship and international law. In addition to that, migration related issues have also initiated new global rights movement and provided new light on the relationship between the state and individuals. Unsurprisingly, with the new power of social media and other platforms, the youths have been outspoken about their concerns and unified to form a collective force.

This conference will engage with emerging questions concerning views of the youth regarding migration related issues. The conference will focus on the younger generation's perspective on the many ways how Public International Law principles like sovereignty, comity etc. collaborate with private law - including how comparative law approach can frame International laws in this area; how each of these issues interact with each other, the effect they have on the evolution and acceptance of societal, religious and cultural values. CALS is also interested in how comparative law perspectives help in building domestic and international law in this area. Additionally, this conference aims to provide a platform to the youths to share their ideas with students around the globe and engage in lively debates and discussion.

TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

CALS Conference
Foreign Investment in Myanmar: Law and Policy

24 March 2016, Wednesday
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)

The Centre for Asian Legal Studies (CALS) is pleased to invite you to the CALS Worksop entitled 'Foreign Investment in Myanmar: Law and Policy'. The workshop will be convened by Dr Yvonne Wong and will be held at NUS in Singapore on 24 March 2016.

In 2010, Myanmar, the country which had closed its doors to the outside world since 1962 signalled a change in its long standing isolationist policy. In November of that year, world famous Nobel peace prize winner Aung San Suu Kyi was released from house arrest by the military regime. Then in March 2011, power was also transferred to a nominally civilian government led by President Thein Sein. This, along with China's growing influence in the region, spurred policy shifts from the west - which had long ostracized Myanmar through various economic sanctions programs. Her book is a collection of chapters from practitioners and experts currently engaged in foreign investment in Myanmar. The gathering of these experts will not only be a valuable exercise for the edited book, but will also be a highly interesting and informative conference for practitioners, scholars and commentators interested in legal and commercial developments in Myanmar.

Dr. Wong will also be launching her book Money Matters in Myanmar during the lunch. This event will be hosted by the Centre for Banking and Finance Law.

The program will be circulated at a later date

TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

CALS Distinguished Lecture
The Nara+20 Process: Authenticity in the Context of the World Heritage System and Beyond

by Professor Toshiyuki Kono
18 March 2016, Friday
6.00pm to 8.00pm
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)

Monuments and buildings have been reconstructed since ancient history. However, reconstruction started to raise normative questions in the 20th century, especially after authenticity became a requirement for inscription in the World Heritage List. It took 30 years from the Venice Charter of 1964 for the international community to find a more flexible approach to questions of authenticity, which was declared in the Nara Document in 1994. Nonetheless, the World Heritage Committee has continuously been called on to assess difficult nominations as societies responded to a number of dramatic changes over the last 20 years. While such changes repeatedly highlighted the need for a new set of normative arrangements to assess matters of authenticity, very little headway was actually made.

Toshiyuki Kono is Distinguished Professor, Kyushu University (Fukuoka, Japan). He currently serves as Vice President of the International Council of Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS), an advisory body of UNESCO, a position he has held since 2014, where he is in charge of, among other things, World Heritage issues. In addition, he has been active in UNESCO as an independent expert, where he has served, for example, as Chairperson of the 3rd General Assembly of the State Parties of the UNESCO Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage in 2010 and Chairperson of the Legal Committee of the 34th UNESCO General Conference in 2007.

TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

Cultural Heritage Law and the Built Environment: Preserving Outstanding Universal Value in Asia's Historic Cities
17 & 18 March 2016, Thursday & Friday
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)

The Centre for Asian Legal Studies (CALS) is pleased to invite you to the CALS Worksop entitled 'Cultural Heritage Law and the Built Environment: Preserving Outstanding Universal Value in Asia's Historic Cities'. The workshop will be convened by Dr Jason R. Bonin and will be held at NUS in Singapore on 17-18 March 2016.

The preservation of the built environment constitutes an important objective of cultural heritage law. Historic urban areas are among the most important expressions of our common cultural heritage, reflecting the broad diversity of human experience and the development of key cultural values and practices across time and space. This workshop will engage with emerging questions concerning the role of cultural heritage law in preserving heritage of outstanding universal value in some of Asia's most important historic cities. The focus will be on the many ways in which the dialectical relationships contained within this body of law - including the relationship between public heritage values and private property values, between the international and the domestic (national and local) regulatory orders, between expert knowledge and local communities, and between the tangible, immovable built heritage and its natural and intangible context - shape the recognition and regulation of built heritage of universal significance. Proposals that employ fresh perspectives to explore these relationships as well as contextual studies of particular cities and urban spaces are particularly welcome.

The program will be circulated at a later date.

TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

Panel Discussion on 'The new commentaries to the Geneva Conventions: An updated interpretation for a modern world of warfare'
3 March 2016, Thursday
Seminar Room 5-4, Block B, NUS (BTC)

CALS and The IRCR will be hosting a panel discussion on the new commentaries to the Geneva Conventions. The panel will discuss the contribution of the new commentaries to the interpretation of the IHL and what I means for Singapore and Southeast Asia.

TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

States, Intergovernmental Relations, and Market Development: The case of contemporary China
by Professor Cheng Jinhua
East China University of Political Science and Law (ECUPL)
24 February 2016, Wednesday
12.00pm - 1.30pm (Lunch included)
Federal Bartholomew Conference Room, Federal Building, NUS (BTC)
TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

Corporate Governance in Asia - Textbook Workshop
22 & 23 February 2016, Monday & Tuesday
Federal Bartholomew Conference Room, Federal Building, NUS (BTC)
(Closed door workshop)

CALS Workshop
Constitutional Debate in Vietnam

19 & 20 February 2016, Friday & Saturday
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)

On 19 & 20 February 2016, Dr Bui Ngoc Son, CALS Research Fellow will be convening a workshop titled Constitutional Debate in Vietnam. The workshop is organized with the support of the Centre for Asian Legal Studies (CALS) and will be held at the Faculty of Law (Bukit Timah Campus).

The workshop will focus on a descriptive approach by discussing the social, economic, and political contexts, the intellectual environment, the substances, and the causes and effects of the Vietnamese constitutional debates. The workshop will also discuss the meaning of the constitutional debates for understanding constitutional change, politics, and society in Vietnam, and for more comparative constitutional understanding of constitutional discourse and constitutional reform in socialist Asia, and the diffusion and localization of global constitutional ideas.

TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

For Queries, please email cals@nus.edu.sg

CALL FOR PAPERS
CROSSING BORDERS IN A TROUBLED WORLD: A YOUTH CONFERENCE ON TRANSNATIONAL MIGRATION

31st MARCH-1st APRIL 2016
Faculty of Law, NUS Bukit Timah Campus


Submission Deadline for abstracts: 15 January 2016

The Centre for Asian Legal Studies (CALS) is pleased to solicit proposals for participation in a Youth Conference entitled 'CROSSING BORDERS IN A TROUBLED WORLD: A YOUTH CONFERENCE ON TRANSNATIONAL MIGRATION'. The conference will be held at NUS in Singapore on 31STMarch-1st April 2016.

Whether due to globalization or the devastation of wars, migration has been a major phenomenon world-wide, especially in the post-world war era. The 2015 Migration and Development Brief by World Bank observes that one out of seven persons (or one billion people) in the world is an international or internal migrant. Today, migration is a major factor shaping economic policies, laws, cultural values, and social structures. Rapidly increasing migration has also increased the incidences of human trafficking and people smuggling. Besides poverty and the allure of better economic opportunities, war, civil unrest and natural disasters are also driving millions into becoming refugees. It is a troubled world that we live in, and migration is the choice that many have made to seek a better life outside the confines of where they were born and (often) raised. Migration therefore implicates not only domestic laws, but also trans-boundary relations and international law. It has also become an impetus for new global rights movements and alliances, as well as shed new light on the relationship between the state and individuals. Unsurprisingly, with the new power of social media and other platforms, youths have been particularly outspoken about their concerns over migration and rights of migrants.

For more information please click HERE

To submit your abstract please click HERE

CALS Distinguished Lecture
Varieties of Constitutionalism

15 January 2016, Friday
Moot Court, NUS (BTC)
TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

Regulating Religion: Normativity and Change At The Intersection of Law and Religion
14 & 15 December 2015, Monday & Tuesday
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)

In most eras and cultures, law and religion relate dialectically. Every major religious tradition strives to come to terms with law by striking a balance between the rational and the mystical, the prophetic and the priestly, the structural and the spiritual. Every major legal tradition struggles to link its formal structures and processes with the beliefs and ideals of its people. Thus, while law and religion can be conceptualized as distinct spheres of human life, they do not exist independently of one another and are constantly cross-fertilizing each other. This workshop will engage emerging scholarship on the influence of religion on legal systems, both historically and currently, and vice versa. Regulation is our key focus. In simplest terms, we will consider how law regulates religion, and how religion responds to such regulations.

The 6th Asian Constitutional Law Forum - Constitutionalism in the Courts: Judicial Review and the Separation of Powers in Asia
10 & 11 December 2015, Thursday & Friday
Block B, NUS (BTC)

The Asian Constitutional Law Forum provides a venue for distinguished scholars and new scholars to share their research and ideas on Asian constitutional law, to expand collaborative research networks, and to facilitate publications. The 2015 Forum, organised by the Centre for Asian Legal Studies at NUS will address mainly the theme of constitutionalism in the courts, and will look at constitutional cases, issues, and overall performance of the judicial branch across Asia as judiciaries establish their independence of the other branches and encounter new and challenging issues. The Forum was first held at the Seoul National University, Korea in 2005; the second meeting was at the Centre for Asian Legal Exchange at Nagoya University in 2007; the third at the College of Law of National Taiwan University in 2009; the fourth at the Centre for Comparative and Public Law at the Faculty of Law, University of Hong Kong in 2011; and the fifth at the Centre for Public Law at Tsinghua University School of Law in Beijing in 2013. This year the Forum is being held in South East Asia for the first time

TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

Osaka City Government v The Man With No Tattoos: Using The Courts As Arbiters Of Social Norms In Japan
18 November 2015, Thursday
3.00pm - 4.30pm
Block B Conference Room (BBCR), NUS (BTC)
TO REGISTER PLEASE EMAIL cals@nus.edu.sg

Illiberal Constitutional and the Deep State In Thailand
9 November 2015, Monday
12.00pm - 2.00pm
Federal Bartholomew Conference Room, Federal Building, NUS (BTC)
TO REGISTER PLEASE EMAIL cals@nus.edu.sg

CALL FOR PAPERS
The Centre for Asian Legal Studies (CALS) is pleased to solicit proposals for participation in a workshop entitled 'Cultural Heritage Law and the Built Environment: Preserving Outstanding Universal Value in Asia's Historic Cities'. The workshop will be convened by Dr Jason R. Bonin and will be held at NUS in Singapore on 17-18 March 2016. All participants are expected to contribute an original and previously unpublished article to an edited publication that will form the intended output of this workshop.

For more information please click HERE
To submit an abstract, please click HERE

The Life and Future of British Colonial Sexual Regulation in Asia
8 & 9 October 2015, Thursday & Friday
Moot Court, NUS (BTC)

The Centre for Asian Legal Studies (CALS) invites you to the conference, The Life and Future of British Colonial Sexual Regulation in Asia, organised by Lynette J. Chua (NUS) and Michael Hor (Hong Kong University), to be held at the Moot Court, Faculty of Law, National University of Singapore, on 8-9 October 2015.

Legal reform surrounding issues of sexual orientation and gender identity (SOGI) is a contemporary phenomenon that generates rich debates and contestations. Whereas the struggles in countries such as the United Kingdom and the United States have turned toward the legal recognition of same-sex relationships, parenting, and adoption, most former British colonies continue to deal with the persistence of colonial sexual regulation and its legacies after achieving independence. In the Asian region, Singapore's Court of Appeal recently upheld the constitutionality of section 377A of the Penal Code, as did the Indian Supreme Court on its section 377. In Malaysia, the government continues to use its revised version of sections 377 and 377A on opposition politicians. In Myanmar, activists are beginning to raise public awareness about their section 377 of the Penal Code. In Hong Kong, although section 377 has been repealed, legal debates have emerged about the age of consent and other post-repeal issues.

These developments raise concerns not only about the rights of SOGI minorities but also questions such as: How do and should today's courts of independent nations decide on the continuing validity of sexual regulation inherited from the British colonial era? What is the role of legislature? How can SOGI minorities achieve equality and social change? How do and should activists advocate for reform?

The conference features papers from over 15 panellists from, Singapore, Bangladesh, India, Thailand, Hong Kong, Pakistan and the UK and a Distinguished Keynote address by the Hon. Michael Kirby.

TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

Judging the Constitution: The Theory and Practice of Constitutional Interpretation in Singapore
28 & 29 May 2015, Thursday & Friday
Moot Court, NUS (BTC)
TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

"Occupy Central for Universal Suffrage: Constitutional Development and Political Reform in Hong Kong"
14 & 15 May 2015, Thursday & Friday
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)
TO REGISTER PLEASE EMAIL cals@nus.edu.sg

CALL FOR PAPERS
The Centre for Asian Legal Studies (CALS) will be organising the 6th Asian Constitutional Law Forum: 'Constitutionalism in the Courts: Judicial Review and the Separation of Powers in Asia' The forum will be will be held on 10-11 December 2015 at NUS in Singapore.

The Forum was first held at the Seoul National University, Korea in 2005; the second meeting was at the Centre for Asian Legal Exchange at Nagoya University in 2007; the third at the College of Law of National Taiwan University in 2009; the fourth at the Centre for Comparative and Public Law at the Faculty of Law, University of Hong Kong in 2011; and the fifth at the Centre for Public Law at Tsinghua University School of Law in Beijing in 2013. This year the Forum is being held in South East Asia for the first time.

Abstracts are to be submitted by 1 May 2015. A committee has been formed which will consider the abstracts, and the authors of approved abstracts will be notified shortly thereafter. The abstract should be not more than 300 words and the author should provide his/ her name, academic appointment or other relevant position, as well as the title of the proposed paper. Participants at the Forum will be responsible for their own travel and accommodation expenses. However, conference registration fee will be waived for participants presenting papers at the Forum

For more information please click HERE

To submit your abstract please click HERE

Presentation of Findings:
"Keeping the Faith: A Study of Freedom of Thoughts, Conscience and Religion in ASEAN"
30 April 2015, Thursday
10.00am - 1.00pm
Executive Seminar Room, Block B (BB-03-02), NUS (BTC)

CALL FOR PAPERS
The Centre for Asian Legal Studies (CALS) is soliciting proposals for participation in a conference entitled, The Life and Future of British Colonial Sexual Regulation in Asia. The conference will be convened by Asst. Prof. Lynette J. Chua of the National University of Singapore (NUS) and Prof. Michael Hor of the University of Hong Kong, and will be held on 8-9 October 2015 at NUS in Singapore.

Abstracts must be for work that is original and has not been published previously. A major publication is anticipated. The Hong Kong Law Journal will consider selected conference papers for a focus issue.

Scholars who would like to participate in this conference should submit an abstract of 150 words and a biographical sketch of 100 words by April 15, 2014. Proposals should focus primarily on the conference scope and objective set out in this call for papers. Funding may be available for those who are selected (no separate funding application is required). Decisions, including funding availability, will be announced by 15 May 2015.

For more information please click HERE

To submit your abstract please click HERE

Geographical Indications at the Crossroads of Trade, Development, and Culture in Asia-Pacific
by Professor Ng-Loy Wee Loon and Visiting Professor Irene Calboli
26 & 27 March 2015
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)

Some studies have shown that geographical indications of origin (GIs) can provide higher economic returns to farmers and other holders of traditional knowledge through price premiums, foster tourism and/or enhance rural development. Other studies have argued that protection of GIs can assist in preservation indigenous knowledge and culture. The various papers presented at this workshop will later be published in a collective volume, which aims at becoming a trendsetter for a constructive debate on GI protection in Asia and on a global scale beyond this region

To download the Program please click HERE

TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

CALS Distinguished Lecture

Sharia and National Law in Asia - A View From the Southeast
11 March 2015
Moot Court, NUS (BTC)

To register for this Workshop, please click HERE

Independent Directors in Asia
by Associate Professor Dan W. Puchniak
26 & 27 February 2015
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)

This Conference builds upon an extremely successful conference organized by Professor Harald Baum from the Max Planck Institute for Comparative and International Private Law on 17-18 July 2014 in Berlin. At the Berlin conference it became abundantly clear that although there is a significant literature on independent directors generally, the vast majority of it views the issue through an Anglo-American (Western) lens.

For more information on the conference, please visit our website

The Sri Lankan Constitutional Transition: From Populist Authoritarianism to Constitutional Democracy?
by Dr Asanga Welikala
University of Edinburgh
23 February 2015, Monday
12.00pm - 2.00pm (Lunch included)
Federal Bartholomew Conference Room, Federal Building, NUS (BTC)
TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

Judging the Constitution: The Theory and Practice of Constitutional Interpretation in Singapore
by Assistant Professor Jaclyn Neo
16 January 2015
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)

Debates over constitutional interpretation occupy a central space in the intellectual discourse of many constitutional systems. In America, for example, whose constitution provides the roots for many constitutionalist ideas, this debate has captured much academic, judicial, and political attention. There, much of the contemporary discussion has focused on the divergence between originalism and "living" constitutionalism. At the heart of this is a struggle between, on the one hand, fidelity to founding meanings and, on the other hand, creative interpretation to suit the context and needs of an evolving society. This contestation determines the authoritativeness of text, context, structure, norms, and theories in constitutional interpretation.

All these cases bear closer reflection, and this is the aim of this workshop. Bringing together scholars of constitutional law, this workshop provides a platform for discussion and debate on these recent developments, and to provide theoretical reflections that go beyond doctrinal and empirical accounts. The end goal is to produce an edited volume that will coincide with fifty years of Singapore's independence in 2015.

Attendance to this Workshop is by Invitation Only, if you have queries please email cals@nus.edu.sg

The Limits of Corporatism: Continued Challenges for Economics Democracy in US, Chinese and Brazilian Unions
by Professor Jedidiah Kroncke
14 January 2015, Wednesday
2.00pm - 3.00pm (Lunch included)
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)
TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

Leniency in Chinese Criminal Law? Everyday Justice in Henan
by Professor Benjamin Liebman
12 January 2015, Monday
12.30pm - 2.00pm (Lunch included)
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)
TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

The Beijing Consensus? How China has changed the western ideas of law and economic development and global legal practices
by Assistant Professor Weitseng Chen
8 - 9 January 2015
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)

The Beijing Consensus remains a contested concept, if not controversial. One may argue if public ownership fits the market economy and helps maintain macro-level stability, why rush to secure private property? If private banks and insurance companies are too big to fail and require public bailout when in crisis, why privatize SOEs in the first place? The list of doubts may go on and on but it reveals more ambiguity of the Beijing Consensus than exact configurations of legal institutions and relevant practices.

The goal of this international workshop is to interrogate this Consensus, if any, from a law and development perspective, with a comparative framework that incorporates experiences of other Asian economies such as Singapore, Japan and Taiwan. Particularly, we aim to bring in not only theoretical analyses but also insights from market and legal practices. This is because most discussions at the moment are divided by disciplines; briefly put, legal scholars examine overall rule of law reforms, political scientists and economists focus on policies touching various dimensions of the state capitalism, while lawyers execute all of the reforms. More dialogues are greatly needed. We intend to create such dialogues by examining the institutional arrangements manifested in legal and market practices to date, in areas such as tax, securities, corporate, health care, property rights, financial institution, trade and foreign investment laws, the exact subjects that define the rival concept Washington Consensus.

For more information, please email cals@nus.edu.sg

Researching State and Personhood: Law and Society in Southeast Asia
by Assistant Professor Lynette Chua
15 & 16 December 2014
Lee Sheridan Room, National University of Singapore, Bukit Timah Campus

This conference is premised on the assumption that state and personhood in Southeast Asia can be fruitfully investigated by drawing on the broad interdisciplinary perspectives of the law and society field.
Scholars studying Southeast Asian cultures and societies have too often avoided coming to terms with "law", which they regard as the exclusive domain of legal specialists.
Their research may be highly relevant to the field of law and society even though they may not view their own work in these terms.

This conference proceeds on the premise that, "Law is too important to be left to the lawyers." It aims to build bridges across disciplinary divides and bring together scholars from diverse academic fields and locations in the region to forge new connections and consider new directions for socio-legal work.

To register for this Conference, please click HERE

The Missionary and the Merchant: How the US and China Use International Economic Law
by Assistant Professor Timothy Webster
Case Western Reserve University
11 December 2014, Thursday
12.00pm - 2.00pm (Lunch included)
Federal Bartholomew Conference Room, Federal Building, NUS (BTC)
TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

China, Southeast Asia and International Economic Law:
Contemporary Issues and Future Prospects

8 December 2014, Monday
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)

The Centre for Asian Legal Studies (CALS) and Xiamen University (XMU) would like to invite you to the Workshop on China, Southeast Asia and International Economic Law Workshop: Contemporary Issues and Future Prospects to be held at the Lee Sheridan Room, Faculty of Law, National University of Singapore, on Monday 8 December 2014. This workshop will bring together leading scholars in the field and researchers from both NUS, Law Faculty and Xiamen University.

At the Workshop, topics on Chinese position on International Economic Law and the International Economic Order, China - ASEAN relations under International Economic Law, BITs and ASEAN-China Free Trade Agreement, TPP, and FTAAP, will be presented and discussed. After the workshop, a report comprising of short essays and commentaries will be produced by CALS and XMU.

TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION
Ethics, Law and Public Policies: A Case of Islamic Biothics

by Dr Ayman Shabana
Georgetown University
28 November 2014, Friday
3.00pm - 5.00pm
Federal Bartholomew Conference Room, Federal Building, NUS (BTC)
TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

Beyond Fragmentation: Building a Unified Securities Market in China (and Asia)
by Prof David C. Donald
The Chinese University of Hong Kong
10 November 2014, Monday
9.00am - 12.00pm
Seminar Room 4-3, Block B, NUS (BTC)
TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

Third World Approach to International Law
by Professor M Sornarajah and Professor Tony Anghie
Moderated by: Dean Simon Chesterman
National University of Singapore, Faculty of Law
3 November 2014, Monday
12.00pm - 2.00pm (Lunch included)
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Seng Building, NUS (BTC)
TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

Jurisprudence in Tang Dynasty China: An Analysis of Selected Tang Dynasty Panwen (Written Legal Judgments)
by Assistant Professor Norman Ho
Peking University School of Transnational Law
27 October 2014, Monday
12.00pm - 2.00pm (Lunch included)
Federal Bartholomew Conference Room, Federal Building, NUS (BTC)
TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

Thai Law as a Civil Law System
by Dr. Munin Pongsapan
Thammasat University
14 October 2014, Tuesday
12.00pm - 1.30pm (Lunch included)
Federal Bartholomew Conference Room, Federal Building, NUS (BTC)
TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

How to Build and Strengthen Effective Clinical Legal Education (CLE) Externship Programmes Workshop
6 October 2014
Lee Sheridan Room, Eu Tong Sen Building, NUS Faculty of Law

Over the past decade, pro bono oriented university clinical legal education (CLE) programmes have expanded throughout the Asia region at an incredibly rapid pace. In doing so, CLE Externship models have been identified as one of the most relevant, achievable and impactful justice education initiatives for universities to foster and operate.

In appreciation of this fact, Bridges Across Borders Southeast Asia Community Legal Education Initiative (BABSEA CLE), BABSEA CLE Singapore, the National University of Singapore (NUS) Faculty of Law, the Center for Asian Legal Studies (CALS) and the Southeast Asia Clinical Legal Education Association (SEACLEA) have organized a one day regional workshop focusing on the development and strengthening of Clinical Legal Education (CLE) Externship Programmes.

To register for the workshop please click HERE
Please take note that space is limited. The program will be circulated at a later date.
For more information on the Workshop, please click here

3rd Annual Asia Pro Bono Conference 2014
2 - 4 October 2014

The 3rd Annual Asia Pro Bono Conference 2014 will bring together academics, law students, lawyers, judiciary, pro bono professionals, policy makers, civil society and non-profit representatives to consider the multifarious ways pro bono initiatives can strengthen access to justice in Southeast Asia and internationally.

The conference will see an exciting mix of keynote speeches, panel discussions and interactive workshop sessions. There will be lots of opportunity for participation, collaboration and dialogue. The sessions will showcase selected, timely and innovative pro bono partnerships and provide a unique space for participants to collaborate in order to improve access to justice for some of the region's most marginalized communities.

CALS will be hosting the 3rd day of the Annual Asia Pro Bono Conference 2014 at the NUS Faculty of Law.
For more information, please visit the Annual Asia Pro Bono Conference 2014 website
Click here for the 3rd Day Conference Programme

Brunei Beyond the Recent Headlines: Emic Perspectives on National Ideology and Socio-Legal Change in a Malay Islamic Monarchy
by Dr. Dominik Müller
Cluster of Excellence "Formation of Normative Orders"
Goethe-University Frankfurt
2 October 2014, Thursday
12.00pm - 1.30pm (Lunch included)
Federal Bartholomew Conference Room, Federal Building, NUS (BTC)
TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

China's Public Procuracy System in the Eyes of a Female Procurator
by Xie Jue
Changning District Procuratorate, Shanghai
30 September 2014, Tuesday
12.00pm - 1.30pm (Lunch included)
Seminar Room 4-3, Block B NUS (BTC)
TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP): Creating a "Living Agreement" for Trade
by Dr. Deborah Elms
Asian Trade Centre, Singapore
17 September 2014, Wednesday
12.00pm - 2.00pm (Lunch included)
Federal Bartholomew Conference Room, Federal Portico, NUS (BTC)
TO REGISTER PLEASE CLICK HERE

Crimes and Criminals: Lessons from Imperial China and Contemporary Japan
by Professor John Haley
Visiting Research Professor
National University of Singapore, Faculty of Law
15 September 2014, Monday
12.00pm - 1.30pm (Lunch included)
Federal Bartholomew Conference Room, Federal Portico, NUS (BTC)

China's Minorities Policy, and the Governance of Tibet and Xinjiang
by Professor Zheng Yongnian
East Asian Institute, National University of Singapore
9 September 2014, Tuesday
12.00pm - 2.00pm (Lunch included)
Seminar Room 4-3, Block B NUS (BTC)

FTAs as Problem-Solving Process in Asia - Will this process begin from Korea-China FTA?
by Professor Won-Mog Choi
Ewha Womans University
3 September 2014, Wednesday
12.00pm - 2.00pm (Lunch included)
Federal Bartholomew Conference Room, Federal Portico, NUS (BTC)

Workshop on Judging the Constitution: The Theory and Practice of the Constitutional Interpretation in Singapore
by Assistant Professor Jaclyn Neo
6 August 2014
Lee Sheridan Room, National University of Singapore, Bukit Timah Campus

This Workshop brings together scholars of constitutional law, it will provide a platform for discussion and debate on these recent developments, and to provide theoretical reflections that go beyond doctrinal and empirical accounts. The end goal is to produce an edited volume that will coincide with fifty years of Singapore's independence in 2015.

Please take note that this workshop is by Invitation Only, if you wish to participate in this workshop, please email Ms. Regana Mydin at CALS at cals@nus.edu.sg

CALS Book Launch: Mobilizing Gay Singapore, Rights and Resistance in an Authoritarian State
by Lynette J. Chua
14 May 2014, Wednesday, 6.30pm
Moot Court, NUS (BTC)

Two theories of religion and Indian traditions in the Western legal systems
by Dr. Prakash Shah
12 March 2014, Wednesday
4.00pm - 5.30pm
CALS Meeting Room, Block B, NUS (BTC)

Corporate Law & Governance in Asia Roundtable
8 March 2014, Saturday
National University of Singapore, Faculty of Law

Multilateral Developments Banks: Law and development interventions in Asia - experiences and directions
by Mr. Suresh Nanwani
6 March 2014, Thursday
4.00pm - 5.30pm
Federal Bartholomew Conference Room, Federal Portico, NUS (BTC)

Trademark Protection and Territoriality Challenges in A Global Economy: Impact to and Perspective from Asia
by Prof. Graeme Austin and Prof. Irene Calboli
18 February 2014, Tuesday
10.00am - 12.00pm
Lee Sheridan Conference Room, Eu Tong Sen Building, NUS (BTC)

Jury Trial and the Role of Citizens at the Criminal Court : Korean Experience and East Asia
by Prof. In Sup Han, Seoul National University
17 February 2014, Monday
10.00am - 11.30am
Federal Bartholomew Conference Room, Federal Portico, NUS (BTC)

Constitutionalism and Legal Change in Myanmar Workshop 2014
13 and 14 February 2014
Lee Sheridan Room, National University of Singapore, Bukit Timah Campus

Islam, Law and the State in Myanmar Workshop 2014
23 to 24 January 2014, Thursday to Friday
Please click here for information on 'Call for Papers'
Submission of abstract is now closed

Centre for Asian Legal Studies and Asian Law Institute
Young Scholars Workshop 2013
Asian Legal Studies: New Issues and New Scholarships

5-6 December 2013, Thursday & Friday

Symposium on Judicial Reform and Political Development in China
28-29 November 2013, Thursday & Friday

Accessibility of the judiciary: What The Netherlands can learn from the Asia-Pacific Region
by Mr. Robert van der Laan, The Netherlands Council for the Judiciary
29 October 2013

Conference On Trials For International Crimes In Asia
17-18 October 2013, Thursday & Friday

Indonesian Islamic Inheritance Law: Testing the Boundaries of Doctrinal Reform
by Professor Mark Cammack, Southwestern Law School, USA
16 October 2013

50 Years Of Malaysia: Federalism Reviewed
27 September 2013, Friday

Cross-Border Insolvency and Private International Law
by Prof. Toshiyuki Kono, Kyushu University, Japan
17 September 2013

"Bengali" and "Bangladeshi": The use of Islamic and Secular Identities in Bangladesh
by Ms. Adeeba Aziz Khan, Barrister-at-Law, English and Welsh Bar by Lincoln's Inn
30 August 2013

Panel on Global Legal Education
Moderated by Dean Simon Chesterman
The panel includes:
Carrie Menkel-Meadow (University of California Irvine Law School, Georgetown University Law Center)
Helena Whalen-Bridge (NUS)
Craig Hoffman (Georgetown Law University), participating via Skype
29 August 2013

CALS Distinguished Visitor Lecture and Book Launch
Constitution-making as applied Comparative Law: Insights from Asia
by Laureate Professor Cheryl Saunders
28 June 2013, Friday

Workshop on Central-local Relations in Constitutional Law: In Asia and beyond
28 & 29 June 2013, Friday & Saturday

10th Asian Law Institute Conference 2013 Celebrating Diversity: 10 Years of Asian Law Institute
23 & 24 May 2013

Vietnamese Courts: Reform and Identity
by Professor Pip Nicholson
Director of Asian Law Centre, Melbourne Law School, Australia
22 April 2013

Workshop on Land Grabs in Asia: What role for the law?
5 & 6 April 2013, Friday & Saturday
NUS, Faculty of Law, Bukit Timah Campus

What Can Asia Teach All Countries About Growth?
by Dr. Mitchell Wigdor
Adjunct Professor, University of Toronto, Faculty of Law
Author of No Miracle: What Asia Can Teach All Countries About Growth
11 March 2013

Handling problem projects: Accountability mechanisms at international financial institutions and case studies
by Mr. Suresh Nanwani
Asian Development Bank (ADB), Philippines
4 March 2013

The Singapore Personal Data Protection Act: An Assessment
by Professor Abu Bakar Munir, University of Malaya Malaysian Centre of Regulatory Studies (UMCoRS)
27 February 2013

Innovating Justice in Asia: The courts of the Future
29-30 January 2013, Tuesday & Wednesday
Organised by: Center for Asian Legal Studies
Supported by: Hague Institute for the Internationalisation of Law

NUS-SMU-HKU Symposium 2013
Rights in Asia: Naming, Blaming, and Claiming
10 & 11 January 2013, Thursday & Friday
NUS, Bukit Timah Campus & SMU, Singapore

Socio-Legal Research on Southeast Asia: Themes, Directions and Challenges
10 & 11 December 2012
Principal Investigator: Asst. Prof. Lynette Chua
Co-principal Investigator: Prof. Andrew Harding
By Invitation Only

Workshop on The Role of Civil Liberties in Civil Society Activism for Social Justice in South East Asia
10 December 2012
Organized by Centre for Asian Legal Studies
Sponsored by Konrad Adenauer Stiftung
By Invitation Only

Workshop on Southeast Asian-based Socio-legal Research
10 to 11 December 2012

Introduction to Qualitative Methods for Socio-legal Scholarship
by Prof. Terence Halliday, American Bar Foundation, USA And
by Prof. David Nelken, University of Macerata Italy and University of Cardiff, UK
6 & 7 December 2012, Thursday & Friday

The Conflation of Ethnicity and Religion: The Malaysian Constitution Revisited
by Dr. Kartina A. Choong, University of Central Lancashire, United Kingdom
30 November 2012, Friday

Malaysian Society at the Constitutional Crossroads
by Professor Hoong Phun ("HP") Lee, Monash University, Faculty of Law, Australia
29 October 2012

Why the Rule of Law is too important to be Left to Lawyers
by Gordon Samuels Prof. Martin Krygier, University of New South Wales, Law and Social Theory, Australia
15 October 2012

Scoping Workshop on Directions & Determinants in Myanmar/Burma’s Legal Reform Process
12 to 13 October 2012

Research Symposium on Pluralism, Transnationalism & Culture in Asian Law
27 to 28 September 2012

Legal Histories of the British Empire
5 to 7 July 2012

9th Asian Law Institute Conference
31 May to 1 June 2012



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